Health Choice VT: Two more good vaccine bills in the Vermont House, one bad bill in the Senate

The following is a legislative update from Health Choice VT, an advocacy group dedicated to protecting freedom of choice in personal medical decisions.

Two more good bills have been introduced in the Vermont House!

H.458 — informed consent prior to administration of any vaccine
H.573 — prohibiting discrimination based on vaccine status

Please urge your elected representatives to support these & the other good bills that have already been introduced. Please also thank the sponsors!

Senate

One very bad bill has been introduced in the Vermont Senate.

S.153 — an act relating to eliminating the religious exemption

This bad bill would ban the parent right to “exempt” or opt-out of any recommended vaccine for school based on religious/conscientious beliefs.

This bad bill was sent to the Senate Committee on Health & Welfare — but the Senate Education Committee this week is taking testimony from the usual suspects concerning COVID, so we suggest you watch carefully, and contact your senators.

PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO TELEPHONE YOUR ELECTED SENATORS AND VOICE YOUR OPPOSITION TO THIS BILL.

PLEASE ASK THOSE WHO REPRESENT YOU TO PLEASE FOCUS ON BILLS THAT WILL PROTECT CONSUMER AND PATIENT RIGHTS, AND RESTORE BALANCE & CHOICE.

Summary

Currently there are 74 doses on the list of vaccines recommended for school, not including the genetic COVID shots, which are not yet FDA approved.

The vaccine industry enjoys zero liability for any harms these shots may cause.

Segregating the unvaccinated is wrong. It is a known fact that those that are fully vaccinated and boosted can still contract and transmit the COVID virus.

SEVERAL GOOD BILLS HAVE BEEN INTRODUCED HERE IN VERMONT.
ASK YOUR REPS & SENS TO READ & SUPPORT THESE GOOD BILLS!

Preventing residents from obtaining services or accessing private businesses because they are not vaccinated with the premise of slow down the transmission is not based on science and only works to sanction and create a discriminatory policy.

Discrimination based on vaccination status is a form of coercion, and violates 21 code of federal regulations section 50.23 and 24, which states, it is illegal to make anybody participate in an experimental program using coercion.

Preventing discrimination based on vaccination status will prevent and heal division and protect equal rights and will also help to protect medical privacy.

Ensuring that persons are given truthful vaccine risk information, prior to vaccination, will help protect patients from vaccine injury — which is very real.

Informed medical decisions should be honored. Nobody should be pressured to take a medical risk.

Image courtesy of Public domain
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2 thoughts on “Health Choice VT: Two more good vaccine bills in the Vermont House, one bad bill in the Senate

  1. The really nice thing about “parental choice” and “religious exemption” is that they carry no moral hazard. The parents can choose to skip vaccinations, and when the kid dies, they don’t suffer consequences.* I know of one Christian sect totally opposed to pediatric health care of any sort– the Church of the Firstborn, down in the southwest. The wife of one guy I met had had eleven kids, of which five were still living.

    The very least the state ought to do is promulgate the circumstances under which the kids die, so that other parents who don’t believe in vaccinations will at least have a little more information upon which they can make their choice.

    *Having your kids die because you choose not to protect them is not an adverse consequence. It’s just an effect you chose to risk.

  2. I’m surprised no one has commented on these proposals. They are important considerations and Ms. Strong is to be congratulated on her foresight.

    My only concern (so far, at least) is with regard to H.573 Sec. 4. 21 V.S.A. § 495 is amended to read:
    17 § 495. UNLAWFUL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICE. Vermont is an ‘Employment-at-Will State’. In other words, both the employer and employee are free to decide when an employment relationship should be terminated. I think some specific language protecting Vermont’s ‘Employment-at-Will’ provisions may be in order.

    Otherwise, these bills are well advised.

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